FAQ’S2021-06-17T13:42:02+00:00

What’s the Difference Between Medical Malpractice and Negligence?

March 28, 2019|

In some circles, the terms “negligence” and “medical malpractice” are used interchangeably. However, there are clear differences. In reality, medical malpractice is a subcategory of negligence. Both of these concepts require a medical professional’s actions or lack of action to lead to the injury or death of a patient. However, in the case of medical malpractice, the medical provider takes action or fails to take action with the knowledge that the patient may suffer harm. In the case of negligence, on the other hand, the medical provider makes a mistake and/or doesn’t know that his or her actions will be harmful. Medical malpractice is considered more serious than medical negligence.  For more information, read here.

 

If someone used my debit card online unauthorized to do so and I dispute the charges, can the bank deny credits back to me?

March 20, 2019|

When Banks Can Refuse to Refund Fraudulent Debit Card Charges

If you are a victim of debit card fraud, you are responsible for the following:

  • $0 if you report the loss or fraud immediately and the card has not been used,
  • Up to $50 if you notify your bank within 48 hours of your lost or stolen card,
  • Up to $500 if you notify the bank with 48 hours and 60 days of your lost or stolen card, and
  • All of the fraudulent charges if you don’t notify the bank until after 60 days.
  • For more information, read here.

 

Can a practice legally refuse to treat a patient if they have an unpaid balance but they haven’t been officially dismissed from the practice?

March 20, 2019|

In all patient challenges, the most important goal is to avoid a claim of patient abandonment and assure that patient care is not neglected. Regardless of the reason for your issues with a patient, whether it’s unpaid bills, failure to follow advice, or mistreatment of staff, the same advice applies.

For more information, read here.

What happens if I slip and fall on the painted line outside of a store due to rain and the pavement being smooth there?

March 18, 2019|

North Carolina negligence laws follow the doctrine of contributory negligence, which bars recovery by the plaintiff if he or she is partially at fault. The majority of other states follow the doctrine of comparative negligence, in which the amount of damages is reduced in proportion to the plaintiff’s degree of fault. Therein is the issue; who saw it such that someone should have picked it up; there has to be “notice”, actual or constructive, of the alleged “defect” in the property; Again – there’s no “strict liability” in North Carolina; merely because you hurt yourself on someone’s property doesn’t make them liable, especially given that NC is a contributory negligence state.

Do I need antibiotics for a tooth infection, dental implant, bone graft or other dental work and is it required for my Dentist to prescribe them?

March 17, 2019|

Use of antibiotics should be judicious and carefully thought out.  Just because you have an “infection” in your tooth, it does not mean you need an antibiotic.  Also, not all “infections” are actually infections.  Not all infections can be cured by antibiotics alone. For more information, read here.

 

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